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“If Benjamin Franklin had picked someone to teach the lessons in self-mastery that he used in his life, he would have picked Bob Burg.”

~ Vic Johnson, Founder AsAManThinketh.net

Posts Tagged ‘The Go-Giver’

The Advancing Woman – Kat Cole

Saturday, January 17th, 2015

In his classic, The Science of Getting Rich, written way back in 1910, Wallace D. Wattles explained a key principle for advancement in business, regardless of where one starts or how little money or connections they begin with. One advances… by advancing (providing value to) others:

“And, in so far as your business consists in dealing with other people…the key thought of all your efforts must be to convey to their minds the impression of increase…convey the impression of advancement with everything you do, so that all people shall receive the impression that you are an advancing man and that you advance all who deal with you…You can convey this impression by holding the unshakable faith that you are in the way of increase and by letting this faith inspire, fill, and permeate every action. Do everything that you do in the firm conviction that you are an advancing personality, and that you are giving advancement to everybody…feel that you are conferring benefits on all.”

Kat ColeI recently read a fantastic article on Time.com written by Charlotte Alter. It describes the journey of Kat Cole who began as a hostess for Hooters at age 17 and became CEO of the billion dollar-plus Cinnabon, Inc. at the age of 32. How she did it was textbook right out of the pages of Wattles’ book. (Though it wasn’t actually her goal – at 18 she was waiting tables there in order to help pay for college where she was studying to be an engineer.)

Earlier in his book Wattles discussed a concept he called being “too big for your present place”:

“You must begin to do what you can do where you are, and you must do all that you can do where you are. You can advance only by being larger than your present place…The world is advanced only by those who more than fill their present places.”

This is a key concept and had much to do with Kat’s rapid rise to success. If you read the above-mentioned Time.com article you saw that everything she did was not just beyond but way above and beyond her job description. Thus, she became too big for her present place. She had to advance. And, she continued to advance. She was… the advancing woman!

Exceptional Value And High Character

Kat certainly embodied “The Law of Value” from John David Mann’s and my, The Go-Giver, which states, “Your true worth is determined by how much more you give in value than you take in payment.”

But, let’s look at another aspect of Kat’s advancement. “The Law of Influence” from that same book says, “Your influence is determined by how abundantly you place other people’s interests first.” This does not mean you are self-sacrificial; it does mean that focusing on bringing value to others is congruent with your values.

One of Kat’s personal values is loyalty. Although she was offered a great job by another private equity firm that she wanted and was about to accept, when she found out the current company was about to be sold (which would be a bad time to leave them), she stayed to help them through the sale. Doing so entailed detailing with 14 other firms.

The result was that she became known as a person of huge value by the other firms as well and suddenly her influence grew exponentially. Now she was in greater demand than ever!

As Wattles succinctly stated in his chapter entitled, The Advancing Man:

“No matter what your profession, if you can give increase of life to others and make them sensible of this gift, they will be attracted to you, and you will get rich.”

Great things don’t happen in a vacuum. People create these opportunities for advancement. And, they do so, as Wattles stated, despite their circumstances. (You can read more about Kat’s personal situation in the Time.com article.)

An Advancing Man?

As I pulled up to the drive-through window of the local fast-food restaurant I sometimes frequent, I was greeted by a smile from a young man, probably not much older than the previously discussed hostess. He read back my special order to me, making sure he had it correct. I thanked him for caring enough to make sure he got it right.

“That’s our job, sir. We want to make sure it’s perfect and that you enjoy your meal.” He said it as though he meant it, and I have no doubt he did.

I was impressed. More than just the desire of my happiness with the dining experience, he knew how to communicate his desire for my happy dining experience.

He provided me with great value via his attitude. He gave me the impression of increase…I suspect he’ll be advancing soon.

Abundance Mindset – Powerful Influencer

Friday, November 7th, 2014

David NeagleThis week I attended Accelerate Live, a four-day event held by David Neagle. The Founder of Life is Now, Inc., David is a very highly regarded income acceleration mentor and giant in the personal development field.

Having mentored a large number of hugely-successful proteges, he has certainly unlocked the door to financial success as well as other areas where success can be defined and measured.

The entire event was extremely well-staged and choreographed, and with a support team in place — including his team of personally-trained coaches — that allowed David to do what he does best…teach from stage.

On a personal note I found it very cool that his mentor was Bob Proctor, upon whom the character Pindar in John David Mann’s and my book, The Go-Giver is loosely based.

While the event’s theme was Influence it was really all about living a life of both personal and professional success. The first two days were more about mindset; the last couple of days more about strategy. Yet, even within the strategic how-to…there was always mindset.

Why? Because it’s always about mindset. We are all human beings constantly dealing with ourselves as well as with other human beings. If we don’t feel good about ourselves; if we don’t see ourselves as winners, if we don’t feel abundant then it’s awfully difficult to influence another person that they will be better off by doing business with us.

Of the many gems shared by David here are just a few:

  • “Create in your mind what you want to accomplish, then grow into the person who accomplishes it.”
  • “Most will only go after what they think they can accomplish; not what they really want.”
  • “How does your prospective client know — just by being in your presence — that you can help them?”
  • “People hear with their ears but they listen with their emotions.”
  • “Hope or wish is {a representation of} internal or external discomfort. It doesn’t mean they want to change.”
  • “Help them get to the point where they can choose to change for themselves.”
  • “When around negative people, the moment you stop consciously rejecting it, you start subconsciously accepting it.”

An abundance mindset with a true focus on bringing value to others leads to powerful influence. Terrific event and valuable lessons!

A Literal Success Truth That Never Fails

Tuesday, May 27th, 2014

A Literal Success Truth That Can Never Fail - Bob BurgFormer Campbell Soup CEO, current Avon Chairman and leadership authority, Doug Conant recently tweeted this famously-profound quote from the classic, Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill:

“It is literally true that you can succeed best and quickest by helping others to succeed.”

This immediately brought to mind one of my all-time-favorite (and, unfortunately, often-misquoted) sayings by the legendary, late Zig Ziglar:

“You can have everything in life you want if you will just help enough other people get what they want.”

What do those two powerful sayings have in common?

That to the degree we can take our focus off of ourselves and place it onto the other person, that’s the degree to which we ourselves will become successful.

Law #3 from The Go-Giver, The Law of Influence states:

“Your influence is determined by how abundantly you place other peoples’ interests first.”

Of course, that doesn’t mean that we should be anyone’s doormat or in any way self-sacrificial. It simply means that when we move from an I or “me-focus” to an “other-focus, we naturally bring more value to — and hold more value to — that person. As Sam, one of the mentors in the story advised the protegee, Joe:

“Make your win about the other person’s win.”

How do you feel that person would then feel about you? Would they be more likely to buy from you? To want to do business with you? To make you a part of their life? Would they be more interested in your success? Would they be more excited about referring/introducing you to those they care about so that you could make your win about their wins, as well?

I believe that — as the first part of Mr. Hill’s quote opined — “it is literally true.”

What do you think? And, how do YOU make your wins about their wins?

Strenghtening Our Receptivity Muscles

Wednesday, April 16th, 2014

Receptivity MusclesIn John David Mann’s and my book, The Go-Giver, Law #5 is “The Law of Receptivity.” Both of us are continually told by others that, while applying this law often created breakthroughs, it was also the most difficult Law to grasp.

When thinking about it on even a surface level, it makes sense. The ability to receive is linked not only to one’s own self-worth but to the constant stream of “money is bad”-type of lack messages provided courtesy of general society and the media.

Once we recognize that as long as we have provided lots of value to others we have earned the right to receive, then it becomes easier to accept this earned abundance.

Or, does it?

After all, our conscious is to our subconscious what the tip of the iceberg is to that part which is under water. We may know something on a conscious level yet our actions are being run by unconsciously programmed beliefs.

In this case, the subconscious nearly always wins.

Unless we consciously work on improving in this regard.

And, while the ability to receive includes financial, it also includes other areas of life such as kindness, friendship, love, acts of service, and sometimes even just a simple compliment.

In other words, we need to actively strengthen our overall receptivity muscles.

Let’s discuss this further in future posts.

Meanwhile, how do you do this? Any examples (personal or from others) you’d like to share?

A Fault-Finder or a GOOD-Finder?

Friday, December 27th, 2013

a good-finder Bob BurgA friend of mine recently sent me an email that said,

“Be a good-finder; not a fault-finder.”

Wow…GOOD advice! :-)

It reminded me of something that Pindar, the main mentor in John David Mann’s and my book, The Go-Giver said to his protégé, Joe:

“Go looking for the best in people, and you’ll be amazed at how much talent, ingenuity, empathy and good you’ll find.”

Amazing how that works!

And, great news — there’s no reason to wait until January 1st. We can begin now!

As an exercise, find something good in everyone you see today. You might have to really search, or it might be readily apparent. Whichever, be sure and find it.

And, if the situation is appropriate, communicate to that person the “good thing” you see in them.

As always, feel free to share any comments here to let us know the results.