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  • Bob Burg

“A no-nonsense approach to building your business through relationships.”

~ Jane Applegate, syndicated Los Angeles Times columnist

Posts Tagged ‘leaders’

Communicating the Vision

Saturday, August 26th, 2017

Speaking with a client about an ongoing issue with his sales team, I brought up a particular concept. When he heard it, he loved it. He saw exactly how it applied to his situation. He also expressed amazement that he had never heard this before.

Except, he had. He’d heard about it numerous times. I know this for a fact since I’m the one from whom he’d heard it numerous times.

Now, lest you think my point is to boast about my great idea, the idea was hardly mine. In fact, the idea is so old there’s no one to even credit for it.

My point is that people can hear an idea but not actually grasp it because they’re not ready to. But, if we don’t continue to repeat it (not obnoxiously, of course, but appropriately, as part of an ongoing message) then even when they are ready they still won’t hear it, because we’ve stopped saying it.

Same for Teams and Organizations

As leaders, as teachers, as influencers, we can—we must—cast a vision. That’s the easy part. Then not only must we hold that vision but continue to communicate it.

Bob-Burg-Communicating-the-Vision

Eventually, when they do get it, and ask you why you never told them that before, rather than calling them a dummy or yelling at them for not listening, simply smile and give them credit for grabbing on to it.

The same goes for when you’ve been telling them something forever and then they suddenly hear it from a third-party, and then report back to you with the brilliant piece of advice they just heard. Simply smile and give them credit for being open to new ideas.

Because a true leader doesn’t care who gets the credit. They just want the ideas to be received and their people to benefit.

And, the more you put the right message in front of them—whether directly from you or from a third-party authority—repetition is critical to effective leadership and influence.

Transparency. The More Things Change…Or, Do They?

Monday, September 5th, 2016

John D. Rockefeller, Sr. and Jr.“…{You} must recognize that we are living in a different generation than the one in which {your} father had lived, and that it was possible, in building up an industry such as {his}, to maintain a comparative secrecy as to methods of work, etc. and to keep business pretty much to those who were engaged in it.

“Today…it {is} absolutely necessary to take the public into one’s confidence, to give publicity to many things, and especially to stand out for certain principles very broadly.”

Obviously, this advice must have been provided fairly recently to a business leader who hadn’t yet caught on that things are significantly different than they had been. Now, instead of operating in secrecy, even a major, multi-national corporation must be — what’s that word we so often hear — transparent, right?

I mean, this is the 21st Century. With the Internet, search engines, social media, and review sites, there are many ways a company can have it’s reputation ruined and its customers, shareholders, and stakeholders angry at them. Now, corporate leaders must — they simply must — adopt this most recent way of conducting their business.

However, that advice was not particularly recent at all! According to Ron Chernow, in his fantastic book, TITAN: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr., this counsel was actually given to John D. Rockefeller, Jr. by his confidant (and future Canadian Prime Minsiter), Mackenzie King regarding handling a tragic and fatal mistake at a family-owned company. While Junior was much more involved in the Rockefeller Foundation, the charitable foundation established by Senior, the advice held for all aspects of the business.

Junior’s father and his associates at Standard Oil were famous for being extremely secretive about their operations. And, this secrecy — far from helping their cause — resulted in very negative public opinion of their business and set the stage for future legal difficulties and eventual threats of imprisonment. Later in his life, even Senior eventually came around and realized his mistake in this regard.

The point is, while the public now has many more avenues for determining what a company truly stands for, they’ve always had a much higher regard (and, trust!) for those companies that not only show their true colors, but communicate them, as well.

Mega-corporation or small business; solo practitioner or non-profit charity; early 1900’s or 2000’s, the principle itself never changes…only the media that expose it for what it truly is.

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We invite you to join us at one of our last two Go-Giver Sales Academy Live Workshops in 20l6. For more information visit: www.gogiversalesacademy.com

Transform your business!

Advice for Future Leaders?

Monday, April 11th, 2016

Advice-for-future-leaders-Bob-BurgRecently, for a magazine article on leadership, I was asked for my top three pieces of advice to future leaders:

The first was to understand that Dale Carnegie totally had it right 80 years ago when he wrote in his classic, How to Win Friends and Influence People, that “Ultimately, people do things for their reasons, not our reasons.”

So, if you are casting a vision to which you want others to commit, you must first commit to them; not as cogs on the way to you accomplishing your goals, but to helping them to accomplish their goals. Align your vision with their wants, needs, desires, and values. Create an environment for them to grow. Practice giving leadership.

Secondly, to realize that earning trust will always be your most valuable personal asset. And, you do that by the way you commit to others genuinely and authentically. One way to accomplish this is by keeping your word, building others at every opportunity, standing for what is right, and always acting congruently with those values.

As Simon Sinek says in his fantastic book, Leaders Eat Last, “Trust evolves once we have enough evidence to satisfy our brain that a person or an organization is, indeed, an honest {entity}.”

Last, but certainly not least, it’s embracing the fact that leadership is never about the technology — it’s alway about the people.

As Geoff Colvin discussed in his terrific book, Humans Are Underrated, the more advanced technology gets and the more that machines can do that humans cannot, the more important elements such as empathy, team-building, collaboration, and interpersonal relationships (you know, those “human things”) will become.

On this same basic topic, my awesome Go-Giver Series coauthor, John David Mann, shared a passage from Rachel’s Diary: http://bit.ly/1MpghdB

Those are our thoughts.

Now, what are YOUR big three (or two, or even just one)? What advice would you give to future leaders in order to help ease their path?

Feel free to share. Looking forward to an enlightening discussion.

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Have you checked out John David Mann’s and my newest book, The Go-Giver Leader Yet? To read an excerpt, a sample chapter, or to purchase it right now, click here.

And, for some entertaining, value-based, business-building wisdom, listen in on the newest episodes of The Go-Giver Podcast.

Kingmakers Instead of Kings

Tuesday, February 9th, 2016

King Chess Piece“Great leaders and top-producing salespeople develop tremendous influence because they focus their actions on looking out for the other person’s interests and serving their needs.

They prefer to give the credit away rather than take it for themselves.

Rather than aspire to be kings, they seek to be kingmakers.

They are constantly on the lookout for ways they can add value to other people’s lives—and in the process they become enormously successful leaders, influencers, and salespeople (not to mention friends, parents, and community members).

Think about the men and women you know who most embody the above. Feel free to share with us any personal stories and examples that come to mind.

Tribe-Building Wisdom from Randy Gage

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015

Randy Gage — like many of us — is a huge fan of Seth Godin’s New York Times bestseller, Tribes.

The book shows how those who desire to make a difference in their world can utilize online media in order to form connections toward a common purpose.

It’s hard to imagine many people who understand more about this than Randy. Through his blog posts, Prosperity TV episodes, bestselling books, and speaking in countless countries, he leads a worldwide tribe in the millions, helping people reach success and prosperity. And, whether you’d like your tribe to be 10 people, 10 thousand people, or even 10 million people, if you build it successfully, you can make a difference!

RandyIn this conversation, Randy provides fascinating insights into why tribes are so important for today’s leaders and potential leaders to embrace. He shows us that the top tribe-builders are masters at connecting, and explains how that all-important connection successfully occurs.

Enjoy…


 
 
Great wisdom from Randy. And, if you’d like to learn more about building your tribe, check out TRIBAL 2015, taking place August 28-30 in San Diego, California. I’ll be one of the speakers, which I’m greatly looking forward to, and I hope to see you there!

tribalevent.com

 


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