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  • Bob Burg

“Master the contents of Endless Referrals and you will practically GUARANTEE your future success.”

~ Tom Hopkins, Author, Master the Art of Selling

Archive for the ‘The Go-Giver’ Category

Is This Contrary to Being a Go-Giver?

Sunday, October 2nd, 2016

Cold Calling - Bob BurgA reader recently emailed me the following:

“Hi Bob, I love being in sales and want to make a difference. The company I just started working for is very focused on cold calling, and closing on the first appointment, which seems contrary to the approach in your and John’s book? I love this company but how do I reconcile this with the Go-Giver principles?”

My response:

Actually, cold-calling is a very legitimate part of sales. It’s certainly not as productive (or fun!) as when you have tons of referred prospects who are predisposed to buy from you. However, when there’s no other way to obtain these qualified prospects other than through cold-calling then that is the way to go. There’s certainly nothing inherently “contra Go-Giver” by doing so; not if what you’re selling is adding significant value to them.

Regarding a one-call close, the same principle applies. Remember, a sale, whether one-call or multi-call is a matter of communicating value to your prospect in such a way that they understand that they are receiving more in use value than what they are paying. When that’s the case they will buy from you whether it’s one call or after many calls.

At the same time, if they never feel they are receiving sufficient value in exchange for what they are paying, they will never do business with you, again, number of calls aside.

Some businesses lend themselves to a one-call close. {Note: the questioner’s business falls into this category.} Others do not, and to try and force that would be counter-productive, manipulative, and sale-focused as opposed to customer-focused.

Understand that with a one-call close type of business you’re going to have to — within that call — establish the know, like, and trust feelings as well as ask the right questions in order to successfully discover what they are looking to accomplish. Then, assuming they understand how the benefits of your product or service can fulfill their wants, needs and desires, they will take ownership.

The Go-Giver framework is all about focusing on bringing value to others. Do that effectively and you will prosper greatly in your business, regardless of how you find your customers and how many calls or visits before the sale occurs.


Want to accelerate your success in 2017? Now is the time to make it happen. Attend our upcoming Go-Giver Sales Academy in Orlando, FL and work closely (limited to just 10 people) for two full days with Kathy Tagenel and me, along with 9 other very successful entrepreneurs and sales professionals. For more information, click here. The Go-Giver Sales Academy is where your business breakthrough can occur.

Build, Encourage, And Recognize Your People!

Wednesday, May 11th, 2016

David-Novak-O-Great-OneWhen John David Mann and I talk about “Building Your People” (Key #2 from The Go-Giver Leader) we mean that in a couple of ways: one is to teach, mentor, and coach them to becoming more effective, both in their defined role within the organization as well as in their own ability to lead others.

Second is to make them feel good about themselves: protected, loved, and valued member of the business family. And, a person whose abilities we believe in.

The first part makes intuitive sense to many who look at leadership in the traditional way. The second part, not always so much.

There’s a tendency for one to feel, “Well, that’s all very nice — warm and fuzzy and all — but maybe we should wait until we’re making some serious money before we go that route.” Not to mention, after they’ve already proven themselves to be worthy of our caring.

Of course, there’s a very powerful and counterproductive false premise at work within that last thought process: namely, that building your people is a luxury that can wait until “after they’ve already…” And, that your company will thrive if you wait.

Building your people, before they’ve proven themselves, while they’re doing so, and on an continual basis is vitally important to the success of your organization. We see it time and again in the hugely successful companies. We see the opposite in the less successful companies. And — something I hear from employees constantly — we see this in once great companies that are now struggling.

Did they forget that it’s their people who made them great? Apparently, yes.

I had the opportunity to read a copy of the just-released business parable by David Novak, Former Chairman and CEO of Yum! Brands (Pizza Hut, KFC, Taco Bell).

The book is entitled, O GREAT ONE!: A Little Story About The Awesome Power of Recognition.

David’s list of business and leadership awards — including one of the “100 Best Performing CEOs in the World” by Harvard Business Review is long and well-deserved.

I mention this because a huge part of his leadership success was the ability to build his people in both of the above-mentioned ways. He did this through recognition; one of the most powerful forms of building a human being.

As the protagonist in this book, Jeff, pointed out:

“First we’ve got to fire up our people, who will then help to get our customers excited about doing business with us, and from there the money will follow. Too many business leaders focus on making money first without considering the fact that it’s people who will make it happen.”

A couple of pages later, when responding to one of the skeptical members of his leadership team, he explained:

“What I don’t think you realize, Anna, is that this isn’t fluffy stuff. It’s very much about results, about recognizing and rewarding the kind of real results that make a difference to this company’s bottom line. And it’s about driving future results by sending a clear message about what behaviors lead to results.”

Anna still didn’t quite get it at that point, but eventually she would.

What today’s top leaders hope is that more and more leaders come to fully understand it. Company slogan’s such as, “Our people are our greatest asset”, “we care about our people” and others are just that; slogans. And, meaningless ones at that…until a culture of this type is created, consistently communicated, and endlessly cultivated.

And that will only happen when today’s leaders understand that there is nothing soft about it whatsoever.

Super Leadership…and A Super Bowl

Friday, April 22nd, 2016

Demarcus WareGo-Giver Leaders tend to be less interested in taking the stage than they are in giving the stage. They are less concerned about themselves than they are about their team and the individuals who comprise that team.

Rather than, “look how great I am!” they authentically communicate how fantastic those on their team are!

And, they communicate this, not just to those outside of their organization (though they certainly do that), but to the team-members themselves. Not only in what they say, and not just in what they do, but also in who they are.

I love this quote by current Denver Broncos All-Pro outside linebacker (and future Hall of Famer) DeMarcus Ware, as shared on Twitter by future Hall of Famer and past All-Pro wide receiver (now coffee entrepreneur), Rod Smith:

You don’t inspire your teammates by showing them how amazing you are,
but by showing them how amazing they are!

And, that, to me, says it all!

Of course, lest we think that this attitude is in any way self-sacrificial, we should note that these types of leaders in the corporate environment tend to have happy and productive teams, and very profitable businesses.

And, I heard somewhere that DeMarcus’ team did pretty well this year, as well! 😉


Advice for Future Leaders?

Monday, April 11th, 2016

Advice-for-future-leaders-Bob-BurgRecently, for a magazine article on leadership, I was asked for my top three pieces of advice to future leaders:

The first was to understand that Dale Carnegie totally had it right 80 years ago when he wrote in his classic, How to Win Friends and Influence People, that “Ultimately, people do things for their reasons, not our reasons.”

So, if you are casting a vision to which you want others to commit, you must first commit to them; not as cogs on the way to you accomplishing your goals, but to helping them to accomplish their goals. Align your vision with their wants, needs, desires, and values. Create an environment for them to grow. Practice giving leadership.

Secondly, to realize that earning trust will always be your most valuable personal asset. And, you do that by the way you commit to others genuinely and authentically. One way to accomplish this is by keeping your word, building others at every opportunity, standing for what is right, and always acting congruently with those values.

As Simon Sinek says in his fantastic book, Leaders Eat Last, “Trust evolves once we have enough evidence to satisfy our brain that a person or an organization is, indeed, an honest {entity}.”

Last, but certainly not least, it’s embracing the fact that leadership is never about the technology — it’s alway about the people.

As Geoff Colvin discussed in his terrific book, Humans Are Underrated, the more advanced technology gets and the more that machines can do that humans cannot, the more important elements such as empathy, team-building, collaboration, and interpersonal relationships (you know, those “human things”) will become.

On this same basic topic, my awesome Go-Giver Series coauthor, John David Mann, shared a passage from Rachel’s Diary: http://bit.ly/1MpghdB

Those are our thoughts.

Now, what are YOUR big three (or two, or even just one)? What advice would you give to future leaders in order to help ease their path?

Feel free to share. Looking forward to an enlightening discussion.


Have you checked out John David Mann’s and my newest book, The Go-Giver Leader Yet? To read an excerpt, a sample chapter, or to purchase it right now, click here.

And, for some entertaining, value-based, business-building wisdom, listen in on the newest episodes of The Go-Giver Podcast.

The Go-Giver Leader

Tuesday, March 29th, 2016

Hi, my name is Calvin Burg. I’m Bob’s cat.

My daddy is too excited about his book being released today (coauthored with my amazing Uncle John) to write this himself so I thought I’d do it for him.

I bet you’re wondering how I’m writing this; you know, without thumbs and all?

Calvin BurgWell, we cats have our ways. And, please don’t confuse me with Liberty the Cat. She was here and gone long before I came on the scene. She also wasn’t as nice as I am as you can see from this post she once wrote when daddy was away speaking.

Anyhoo, about this new book, it’s called The Go-Giver Leader. I’ve never seen the old man doing so much stuff like talking it up on the phone, writing emails, doing interviews on that Skype thing he has, blog posts, and other things. It’s crazy. I think I even once heard him use the word, “meshuga” though I think that kinda’ means the same thing as crazy.

If you want to know more about it, you can read an excerpt or even an entire sample chapter by clicking here.

Or, you can go right to Amazon.com which I’m pretty sure is where Pops goes to buy my cat food. Which, reminds me — I have a feeling that the more people who buy his book, the better the chances are I can keep eating that really expensive cat food. Okay, don’t tell Dad I said that. He’d be mad because he likes people to buy stuff from him only because they feel it will be — how does he say it? — oh, that’s right, “more in value to them than what they are paying for it”…or something like that. Meow!

So, click here, take a look, buy the book if you’d like, and tell all your human friends about it. I think they’ll like it. Okay…and they’ll find it to be of value, too.

Yours in meowness,