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“Just in my second year in business, I'm on track to do over a MILLION DOLLARS in commissions!”

~ Cal Faber, Agent, RE/MAX - Victoria, BC

Archive for the ‘The Go-Giver’ Category

Noble Selling Purpose…and Profit – In Perfect Harmony

Tuesday, January 27th, 2015

Selling With Noble PurposeLisa Earle McLeod is the author of Selling with Noble Purpose, a book that basically shows how and why those whose actual purpose in selling what they sell is greater than the money…actually make more money.

In a recent post she wrote:

“People often ask me: How do you balance Noble Purpose with the need to make a profit? My answer is, you don’t balance Noble Purpose against profits. Successful organizations make more profits because their Noble Purpose drives their business decisions.”

When thinking about it this makes total sense. Not only is there no dichotomy between selling this way and making a profit, the two are absolutely aligned. When your purpose in selling your product or service is noble your focus is totally and absolutely on the value you bring to your customer. The customer feels this; he or she understands this and is much more likely to buy from you.

This — of course — aligns with John David Mann’s and my statement from Go-Givers Sell More that, “Money is an echo of value. It’s the thunder to value’s lightning.”

Yes, Lisa’s philosophy of Selling with Noble Purpose is not “la la”…it’s not “out there” and it’s not in any way self-sacrificial.

Far from having to balance anything…it’s the most congruent and harmonious way to do business. It’s  also the most profitable way of doing business one can possibly imagine while bringing ultimate value to others.

Now THAT’S a win all the way around!

And, as Lisa says:

“When Noble Purpose guides your business, you make more money.  When Noble Purpose guides your life, you become happier and more successful.”

Question: What is YOUR Noble Purpose in sales? How about in life?

The Advancing Woman – Kat Cole

Saturday, January 17th, 2015

In his classic, The Science of Getting Rich, written way back in 1910, Wallace D. Wattles explained a key principle for advancement in business, regardless of where one starts or how little money or connections they begin with. One advances… by advancing (providing value to) others:

“And, in so far as your business consists in dealing with other people…the key thought of all your efforts must be to convey to their minds the impression of increase…convey the impression of advancement with everything you do, so that all people shall receive the impression that you are an advancing man and that you advance all who deal with you…You can convey this impression by holding the unshakable faith that you are in the way of increase and by letting this faith inspire, fill, and permeate every action. Do everything that you do in the firm conviction that you are an advancing personality, and that you are giving advancement to everybody…feel that you are conferring benefits on all.”

Kat ColeI recently read a fantastic article on Time.com written by Charlotte Alter. It describes the journey of Kat Cole who began as a hostess for Hooters at age 17 and became CEO of the billion dollar-plus Cinnabon, Inc. at the age of 32. How she did it was textbook right out of the pages of Wattles’ book. (Though it wasn’t actually her goal – at 18 she was waiting tables there in order to help pay for college where she was studying to be an engineer.)

Earlier in his book Wattles discussed a concept he called being “too big for your present place”:

“You must begin to do what you can do where you are, and you must do all that you can do where you are. You can advance only by being larger than your present place…The world is advanced only by those who more than fill their present places.”

This is a key concept and had much to do with Kat’s rapid rise to success. If you read the above-mentioned Time.com article you saw that everything she did was not just beyond but way above and beyond her job description. Thus, she became too big for her present place. She had to advance. And, she continued to advance. She was… the advancing woman!

Exceptional Value And High Character

Kat certainly embodied “The Law of Value” from John David Mann’s and my, The Go-Giver, which states, “Your true worth is determined by how much more you give in value than you take in payment.”

But, let’s look at another aspect of Kat’s advancement. “The Law of Influence” from that same book says, “Your influence is determined by how abundantly you place other people’s interests first.” This does not mean you are self-sacrificial; it does mean that focusing on bringing value to others is congruent with your values.

One of Kat’s personal values is loyalty. Although she was offered a great job by another private equity firm that she wanted and was about to accept, when she found out the current company was about to be sold (which would be a bad time to leave them), she stayed to help them through the sale. Doing so entailed detailing with 14 other firms.

The result was that she became known as a person of huge value by the other firms as well and suddenly her influence grew exponentially. Now she was in greater demand than ever!

As Wattles succinctly stated in his chapter entitled, The Advancing Man:

“No matter what your profession, if you can give increase of life to others and make them sensible of this gift, they will be attracted to you, and you will get rich.”

Great things don’t happen in a vacuum. People create these opportunities for advancement. And, they do so, as Wattles stated, despite their circumstances. (You can read more about Kat’s personal situation in the Time.com article.)

An Advancing Man?

As I pulled up to the drive-through window of the local fast-food restaurant I sometimes frequent, I was greeted by a smile from a young man, probably not much older than the previously discussed hostess. He read back my special order to me, making sure he had it correct. I thanked him for caring enough to make sure he got it right.

“That’s our job, sir. We want to make sure it’s perfect and that you enjoy your meal.” He said it as though he meant it, and I have no doubt he did.

I was impressed. More than just the desire of my happiness with the dining experience, he knew how to communicate his desire for my happy dining experience.

He provided me with great value via his attitude. He gave me the impression of increase…I suspect he’ll be advancing soon.

Consciously Receiving

Thursday, October 16th, 2014

Consciously Receiving - Bob BurgBoth in business and personally you focus on providing lots of value to others. You enjoy doing so. It is part of your value system.

Because of this, your relationships in all aspects of your life are very positive. People seem to go out of their way to want to provide value to you.

So, let me ask you…

When you have an opportunity to receive (whether money, a compliment, love, friendship, lunch, etc.) do you feel yourself resisting it?

Suggestion: When this happens, move immediately into conscious awareness mode and ask yourself why you might be resisting.

Your answer will provide you with what you might need to be working on at this very moment.

Your thoughts?

Sir Sidney Poitier’s Inspiring Advice

Thursday, August 14th, 2014

Nancy Vogl owns a successful speakers bureau and regularly posts to a Facebook group of speaking professionals to which I belong. One of her recent posts – while intended as a lesson for speakers, – is a lesson for everyone, both in terms of following our own dreams…and in being an encourager for others to follow theirs. Both attributes help make for a successful human being.

Here’s Nancy’s post, edited just slightly in order to make it less “speaker-specific.”

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A LESSON FROM SIR SIDNEY POITIER
Posted on Facebook by Nancy Vogl

Tyler and Sidney PoitierLast month, NSA (National Speakers Association) Youth Leader — and my grandson — Tyler Cole spent two glorious hours on his 18th birthday with the legendary actor, Sidney Poitier. Tyler recently graduated from one of the most prestigious performing arts high schools in the country (LACHSA), and Mr. Poitier invited Tyler to his home to screen one of Tyler’s award-winning student films and to talk about acting and filmmaking.

Early on in the visit, Sidney in his rich, melodic voice said to Tyler:

“So, I understand you want to be an actor…is that right?”, cocking his head to the side, in a classic Sidney Poitier move.

“Yes sir, yes I do,” replied Tyler with great conviction.

Sidney paused and smiled for a brief moment, then looked Tyler square in the eyes, pointing his finger right at his heart, as if he were speaking to his soul, and said, “You already are.”

What Sidney Poitier did for Tyler — on that once-in-a-lifetime day — with that simple phrase was simply this: He reminded Tyler that it was his desire, his passion, his determination, his talent, his love for the craft that gives him the right to call himself an “Actor.” From there, his task is taking deliberate action so the rest of the world knows it too.

And so it goes with anyone wishing to make their mark in the world.

If your heart is burning to share your message, talents or gifts, and you, too, are determined to work at your craft with gusto, you can call yourself whatever you choose. Now, your task is working towards that goal.

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Nancy Vogl owns Nancy Vogl Speakers Bureau. If you are having a conference, Nancy can help you choose the right speaker(s) to fit your needs.

The Next Best Thing to Controlling Our Brand

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014

To What Degree Can We “Control” Our Brand?At our recent Speaker Certification Training for a group of our Certified Go-Giver Speakers, the following was pointed out:

“Bob, you are really protective of your brand.”

All heads nodded in agreement…including mine.

Allow me — if I may — to set the stage: On the day that our speakers were giving their presentations, whenever there was a statement that could possibly be misunderstood, I would, afterwards, gently (yes, gently) point it out and explain why.

I’m also known to politely email bloggers and those on Social Media platforms who take the philosophy of The Go-Giver out of context or misquote. And, it happens often.

Does it drive me a little bit nutty keeping on top of it? Sure, to a certain point. Fortunately, it also teaches me two very valuable lessons:

  1. To the degree you can care without emotional attachment to the results, that’s the degree to which you’ll have peace of mind.
  2. You can manage your brand, but you can’t really control it.

We, as business people in today’s environment, cannot control it any more than we can really control anything that is outside our direct influence. We can manage it by taking all the steps that are within our influence. That begins by communicating our message correctly, always doing our best to provide an exceptional customer experience and being ultra-responsive to our customer’s needs.

Along with that, we can utilize various Internet and social media “alerts” to let us know when something about our brand is positively or negatively mentioned, stolen (accidentally or…”accidentally on purpose”) :-) or simply misinterpreted. People who are “watching our backs” will also let us know, and this includes customers, clients and friends.

There are major corporations that — especially in their utilization of social media — do this extremely well. Others? Not so much. And, we continue to see examples of both.

Regardless, whether huge or mid-sized companies or small entrepreneurial firms, none are actually controlling their brands. Those days are along gone. We can manage our brands; not control them.

Wisdom is knowing the difference.

Success is doing it effectively.

How do you do in that regard? And, do you agree with my premise or have I missed the mark?

Agreement and disagreement are both welcome, as I hope you know.