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“Bob Burg opens the floodgates to Fort Knox.”

~ Dottie Walters, Author, Speak & Grow Rich

Archive for the ‘Success’ Category

Kingmakers Instead of Kings

Tuesday, February 9th, 2016

King Chess Piece“Great leaders and top-producing salespeople develop tremendous influence because they focus their actions on looking out for the other person’s interests and serving their needs.

They prefer to give the credit away rather than take it for themselves.

Rather than aspire to be kings, they seek to be kingmakers.

They are constantly on the lookout for ways they can add value to other people’s lives—and in the process they become enormously successful leaders, influencers, and salespeople (not to mention friends, parents, and community members).

Think about the men and women you know who most embody the above. Feel free to share with us any personal stories and examples that come to mind.

John Lee Dumas on Accomplishing Your #1 Goal

Wednesday, January 20th, 2016

Success stories — how an individual moves from Point A to Point B — are always a joy for me to hear, and an even bigger joy to share.

John Lee Dumas’ story is particularly inspiring because he’s also a friend, and he just…does things right!

If you regularly listen to podcasts or are involved with them yourself, you know the name, John Lee Dumas. He’s the creator and host of EOFire (Entrepreneurs On Fire) which generates over 1.2 million unique listens per month (yes, that’s per “month!”) inspiring entrepreneurs to take control of their lives and take their entrepreneurial leap.

John-Lee-DumasHe’s truly right at the top of his field. And, his keynote address at last year’s huge Podcast Movement 2015 touched lives in a magnificent way.

Along his journey, John has interviewed over 1200 successful entrepreneurs. He says he found one commonality in each and every one of them: “their ability to set and accomplish goals.” On the other hand, he says, “struggling entrepreneurs fail to do this very thing.”

John is a big believer in SMART Goals: (S)pecific, (M)easurable, (A)ttainable, (R)elevant, (T)ime-bound. Yes, those have been around for a long time. And, for good reason: when applied correctly, they work!

And, of course, while goals themselves are so very important, there is more involved in order for success to take place. Want to know how to accomplish your big goal?

Enjoy this conversation with John Lee Dumas:

The Freedom Journal - John Lee Dumas

 

 

TheFreedomJournal.com

 

Wow! Easy to see why John is a force to be reckoned with and has attained such a huge level of success in his field.

Be sure and check out John’s, The Freedom Journal. As John mentioned, his goal — via this journal — is to help you accomplish your #1 goal within the next 100 days!

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TECHNICAL NOTE: If you are having trouble playing the audio interview, please make sure Adobe Flash Player is installed in your web browser. If not, then download Flash Player. Or right-click here and select “Save Link As…” to download the audio file to your computer.

The Gratitude Tool That Works…Every Time!

Monday, November 23rd, 2015

Thank You NotesLong before the rise of email and social media I was extolling the virtues and value of saying “thank you” with handwritten notes. While certainly not an original idea (whose Mom didn’t make them write thank you notes for gifts?) :-) they remain — in my opinion — one of the best ways to express gratitude and make another person feel genuinely good about themselves and the value they provide.

I’m often asked, “But with email so accessible and so much easier to write than a handwritten, hand-addressed, hand-stamped envelope, isn’t it so much easier to just send emails?”

Absolutely! That’s even one more reason why handwritten, personalized notes are so much more effective. Talk about distinguishing yourself — and your message — from others!

Whether sending a thank you note to a service person, their employer, a customer, your salesperson, a team member, and especially to those people who typically don’t receive acknowledgement, not only do they feel great about themselves, they feel great about you, too!  No, that isn’t why you do it — it’s simply the natural result.

Truly Treasured

When speaking about this during sales and leadership conferences I’ll often hear from successful audience members who do this regularly. One of the most common stories is their discovering that many of those to whom they’ve sent these notes…have kept them!

Yes, people often keep them! Why?

Because…

  1. they’ve been acknowledged;
  2. they’ve  been acknowledged in a powerful and personal way;
  3. they received something from you they most likely have never received before.

In his excellent book, Creating Magic (highly recommended!!) former Executive Vice President of Operations for the Walt Disney World® Resort, Lee Cockerell — an avid note writer — shared a very touching story of a team member who had his note framed…and hung in his home!

Powerful!

While I have a specific format for my personalized notecards, there’s no one correct way.

What’s key is forming the habit of sending them, and sending them often.

Have you experienced something similar either by being on the giving or receiving end of a personalized, handwritten thank you note?

Please feel free to share.

Make Your Ship Unsinkable

Wednesday, October 21st, 2015

Make Your Ship Unsinkable - Bob Burg

A recent tweet said:

“An entire sea of water can’t sink a ship unless it gets inside. Similarly, the negativity of the world can’t put you down, unless you allow it inside your heart and mind.” ~ A. Nonymous

This makes a lot of sense. To believe we don’t live in a world filled with negativity would be to delude ourselves.

Of course, there’s also much positivity but there’s a difference:

When you drink a glass of clean, pure water it sustains you, but it doesn’t generally cause a feeling one way or the other. We simply accept it — often unconsciously — for what it is.

However, put just a little bit of poison in that water and the consequences are profound.

Fifteen nice, decent people might not have much of an effect on your day. After all, people are supposed to be nice and decent. We simply accept it.

However, what happens when one miserable, insulting creep crosses your path? One’s entire day can change for the (much) worse…

That is, IF we let that negativity get inside us.

Two ways to keep it from sinking our ship:

  1. Choose not to take it personally. This takes a lot of work on an ongoing, consistent basis. For an excellent guide in this regard, read Don Miguel Ruiz’, The Four Agreements.
  2. Surround yourself with positive. Read, watch, and listen to good, positive, uplifting materials on an ongoing, consistent basis. And, hang out with good, positive, uplifting people as much as you can.

A ship fortified to that degree simply cannot be sunk.

What are some of the ways you protect the ship that is your mind?

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An expanded edition of The Go-Giver has been released. It includes a Discussion Guide and a Q&A section. Check out http://bit.ly/tggnew. And, if you’d like to give the book as gifts to the special people in your life…you can also get some of your Holiday shopping done early.

Why This Successful Hall-of-Famer Embraces Failure

Thursday, September 24th, 2015

The Power of Failure - Fran TarkentonPersonally, I’ve never enjoyed failure. I don’t think many people do. However, there is a big difference between not enjoying failure…and learning from failure.

And, that’s the major lesson in Hall of Fame Quarterback — now longtime superstar entrepreneur — Fran Tarkenton’s terrific new book, The POWER of FAILURE: Succeeding in The Age of Innovation.

Fran has had more victories, both in sports and in business, than most of us could ever dream of. Yet, he sees failure as the very thing that helps you succeed rather than keeps you from doing so.

The Founder and CEO of The Tarkenton Companies and GoSmallBiz.com believes that entrepreneurs and business leaders need to stop the usual avoidance of thinking and talking about failure. The reason, as he suggests, is that, whether this avoidance has to do with ego or self-delusion it is actually very harmful in terms of eventual success.

“Talking about failure is recognizing reality, and as long as you come to grips with reality, you have a chance to succeed. More than that” he continues, “talking about failure builds credibility with your team by demonstrating that you are not a leader who hides from the truth. By openly talking about failure, you model for your team the attitude and behavior you want from them: vigilance, a dynamic and continuous desire to improve, transparency, and straight talk.” As he says, “Reality asserts itself. Sooner or later it always does.”

nfl_fran-tarkenton-bleacherreport.com

Encouraging Failure 

In today’s business world, especially with advances in technology as they are, innovation is so very key to a flourishing enterprise. And, innovation, by its very nature includes lots of failures. Stories of failure after failure on the way to successful inventions, businesses, careers or other desirable outcomes are so numerous they’ve become proverbial.

And, as the author says, “The truth is this. Any company of any size can develop a culture that encourages innovation, even on a daily basis. To do this, however, such a company must also encourage failure — especially intelligent failure — every day.”

Intelligent failure is a key. It isn’t failing just to fail. And it isn’t failing because you didn’t put enough thought into your venture. Fran admonishes, “Don’t let your optimism get in the way of your homework.”

Powerful! It’s about doing things for the right reasons, and in the right way. And, it always has to do with thinking and acting. One without the other will practically always result in failure and not the good kind. How can you learn and grow if you act before you think or think without acting? Both are important if you’re going to fail correctly. When you do this you’ll also “avoid the big failure by learning from smaller ones.” 

The book itself is filled with a number of wise quotes. Two of my favorites are:

“{P}erhaps the only unbreakable rule of entrepreneurship: the faster we fail, the faster we succeed.”

And, my very favorite:

“True knowledge is a start, not an end. It is a question, not an answer.”

How do you do in the failure department? Have your failures been intelligent ones from which you were able to learn, grow, and ultimately profit?

What can you change in both your attitude about — and approach to — failure that will help you to ultimately succeed in the way you desire?