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  • Bob Burg

“Bob Burg opens the floodgates to Fort Knox.”

~ Dottie Walters, Author, Speak & Grow Rich

Archive for the ‘Influence’ Category

Super Leadership…and A Super Bowl

Friday, April 22nd, 2016

Demarcus WareGo-Giver Leaders tend to be less interested in taking the stage than they are in giving the stage. They are less concerned about themselves than they are about their team and the individuals who comprise that team.

Rather than, “look how great I am!” they authentically communicate how fantastic those on their team are!

And, they communicate this, not just to those outside of their organization (though they certainly do that), but to the team-members themselves. Not only in what they say, and not just in what they do, but also in who they are.

I love this quote by current Denver Broncos All-Pro outside linebacker (and future Hall of Famer) DeMarcus Ware, as shared on Twitter by future Hall of Famer and past All-Pro wide receiver (now coffee entrepreneur), Rod Smith:

You don’t inspire your teammates by showing them how amazing you are,
but by showing them how amazing they are!

And, that, to me, says it all!

Of course, lest we think that this attitude is in any way self-sacrificial, we should note that these types of leaders in the corporate environment tend to have happy and productive teams, and very profitable businesses.

And, I heard somewhere that DeMarcus’ team did pretty well this year, as well! 😉

 

Advice for Future Leaders?

Monday, April 11th, 2016

Advice-for-future-leaders-Bob-BurgRecently, for a magazine article on leadership, I was asked for my top three pieces of advice to future leaders:

The first was to understand that Dale Carnegie totally had it right 80 years ago when he wrote in his classic, How to Win Friends and Influence People, that “Ultimately, people do things for their reasons, not our reasons.”

So, if you are casting a vision to which you want others to commit, you must first commit to them; not as cogs on the way to you accomplishing your goals, but to helping them to accomplish their goals. Align your vision with their wants, needs, desires, and values. Create an environment for them to grow. Practice giving leadership.

Secondly, to realize that earning trust will always be your most valuable personal asset. And, you do that by the way you commit to others genuinely and authentically. One way to accomplish this is by keeping your word, building others at every opportunity, standing for what is right, and always acting congruently with those values.

As Simon Sinek says in his fantastic book, Leaders Eat Last, “Trust evolves once we have enough evidence to satisfy our brain that a person or an organization is, indeed, an honest {entity}.”

Last, but certainly not least, it’s embracing the fact that leadership is never about the technology — it’s alway about the people.

As Geoff Colvin discussed in his terrific book, Humans Are Underrated, the more advanced technology gets and the more that machines can do that humans cannot, the more important elements such as empathy, team-building, collaboration, and interpersonal relationships (you know, those “human things”) will become.

On this same basic topic, my awesome Go-Giver Series coauthor, John David Mann, shared a passage from Rachel’s Diary: http://bit.ly/1MpghdB

Those are our thoughts.

Now, what are YOUR big three (or two, or even just one)? What advice would you give to future leaders in order to help ease their path?

Feel free to share. Looking forward to an enlightening discussion.

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Have you checked out John David Mann’s and my newest book, The Go-Giver Leader Yet? To read an excerpt, a sample chapter, or to purchase it right now, click here.

And, for some entertaining, value-based, business-building wisdom, listen in on the newest episodes of The Go-Giver Podcast.

The Go-Giver Leader

Tuesday, March 29th, 2016

Hi, my name is Calvin Burg. I’m Bob’s cat.

My daddy is too excited about his book being released today (coauthored with my amazing Uncle John) to write this himself so I thought I’d do it for him.

I bet you’re wondering how I’m writing this; you know, without thumbs and all?

Calvin BurgWell, we cats have our ways. And, please don’t confuse me with Liberty the Cat. She was here and gone long before I came on the scene. She also wasn’t as nice as I am as you can see from this post she once wrote when daddy was away speaking.

Anyhoo, about this new book, it’s called The Go-Giver Leader. I’ve never seen the old man doing so much stuff like talking it up on the phone, writing emails, doing interviews on that Skype thing he has, blog posts, and other things. It’s crazy. I think I even once heard him use the word, “meshuga” though I think that kinda’ means the same thing as crazy.

If you want to know more about it, you can read an excerpt or even an entire sample chapter by clicking here.

Or, you can go right to Amazon.com which I’m pretty sure is where Pops goes to buy my cat food. Which, reminds me — I have a feeling that the more people who buy his book, the better the chances are I can keep eating that really expensive cat food. Okay, don’t tell Dad I said that. He’d be mad because he likes people to buy stuff from him only because they feel it will be — how does he say it? — oh, that’s right, “more in value to them than what they are paying for it”…or something like that. Meow!

So, click here, take a look, buy the book if you’d like, and tell all your human friends about it. I think they’ll like it. Okay…and they’ll find it to be of value, too.

Yours in meowness,

Calvin

Kingmakers Instead of Kings

Tuesday, February 9th, 2016

King Chess Piece“Great leaders and top-producing salespeople develop tremendous influence because they focus their actions on looking out for the other person’s interests and serving their needs.

They prefer to give the credit away rather than take it for themselves.

Rather than aspire to be kings, they seek to be kingmakers.

They are constantly on the lookout for ways they can add value to other people’s lives—and in the process they become enormously successful leaders, influencers, and salespeople (not to mention friends, parents, and community members).

Think about the men and women you know who most embody the above. Feel free to share with us any personal stories and examples that come to mind.

Steve Harvey and Rechecking Our Empathy

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2015

Miss Universe 2015I didn’t watch the Miss Universe Pageant this past weekend. Like most everyone, however, I couldn’t help but hear what happened at the end. Yes, Steve Harvey, the very popular television personality who was hosting the event mistakenly announced the wrong person as the winner.

Obviously, while not a tragedy in the true sense of the word, it’s still a highly embarrassing and…well, just a really unfortunate thing to have happened.

Being who he is, Mr. Harvey took full responsibility and apologized. (See this excellent article by my friend, Barbara Abramson.)

And, there’s no question that he felt (and still feels) absolutely sick about it!

Twitter Insults Afire!

While there were some encouraging tweets, basically, the Twitterverse and all social media lighted up with insults and other Steve Harvey-based negative memes.

What’s disappointing is that most of these people are generally charitable, kind, and would most likely come to the aid of anyone they believed to be in need. However, they eagerly participated in the Steve Harvey pile-on, laughing at the misfortune of others.

All it really takes is a bit of thought to understand why it’s inappropriate. No, make that a bit of feeling. A bit of putting oneself in another’s place.

We seem to have lost some of that empathy of late.

Now, of course, Steve Harvey will most likely not know of any one individual’s tweet, laughter, or derision.

However, There Are Many Others

Let’s take this situation and bring it closer to home. When someone we know makes a horrible mistake at work, or says something that embarrasses him or her in the eyes of others, or commits some kind of social faux pas, what do we do?

Do we laugh (out loud or even to ourselves)? Or, do we feel badly for them? Do we stand up for them publicly or — if that’s not appropriate or possible — take them aside and at least encourage them?

Do we teach our children to FEEL for those at school who are bullied or made fun of?

Do we keep from unnecessarily shaming a person? Do we teach our children the importance of same?

These are simply human questions.

Let’s all realize that when someone makes a mistake, the chances are they already feel ashamed. Let’s not shame them further. And, yes…let’s even empathize with them.

It’s part of being human. Just like Steve Harvey.