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  • Bob Burg

“Nothing short of fantastic. I would recommend, without reservation, Bob's program to any other sales professional.”

~ Allen L. Howard, CLU, General Manager, New York Life Insurance Company

Advice for Future Leaders?

April 11th, 2016 by Bob Burg

Advice-for-future-leaders-Bob-BurgRecently, for a magazine article on leadership, I was asked for my top three pieces of advice to future leaders:

The first was to understand that Dale Carnegie totally had it right 80 years ago when he wrote in his classic, How to Win Friends and Influence People, that “Ultimately, people do things for their reasons, not our reasons.”

So, if you are casting a vision to which you want others to commit, you must first commit to them; not as cogs on the way to you accomplishing your goals, but to helping them to accomplish their goals. Align your vision with their wants, needs, desires, and values. Create an environment for them to grow. Practice giving leadership.

Secondly, to realize that earning trust will always be your most valuable personal asset. And, you do that by the way you commit to others genuinely and authentically. One way to accomplish this is by keeping your word, building others at every opportunity, standing for what is right, and always acting congruently with those values.

As Simon Sinek says in his fantastic book, Leaders Eat Last, “Trust evolves once we have enough evidence to satisfy our brain that a person or an organization is, indeed, an honest {entity}.”

Last, but certainly not least, it’s embracing the fact that leadership is never about the technology — it’s alway about the people.

As Geoff Colvin discussed in his terrific book, Humans Are Underrated, the more advanced technology gets and the more that machines can do that humans cannot, the more important elements such as empathy, team-building, collaboration, and interpersonal relationships (you know, those “human things”) will become.

On this same basic topic, my awesome Go-Giver Series coauthor, John David Mann, shared a passage from Rachel’s Diary: http://bit.ly/1MpghdB

Those are our thoughts.

Now, what are YOUR big three (or two, or even just one)? What advice would you give to future leaders in order to help ease their path?

Feel free to share. Looking forward to an enlightening discussion.

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Have you checked out John David Mann’s and my newest book, The Go-Giver Leader Yet? To read an excerpt, a sample chapter, or to purchase it right now, click here.

And, for some entertaining, value-based, business-building wisdom, listen in on the newest episodes of The Go-Giver Podcast.

The Go-Giver Leader

March 29th, 2016 by Bob Burg

Hi, my name is Calvin Burg. I’m Bob’s cat.

My daddy is too excited about his book being released today (coauthored with my amazing Uncle John) to write this himself so I thought I’d do it for him.

I bet you’re wondering how I’m writing this; you know, without thumbs and all?

Calvin BurgWell, we cats have our ways. And, please don’t confuse me with Liberty the Cat. She was here and gone long before I came on the scene. She also wasn’t as nice as I am as you can see from this post she once wrote when daddy was away speaking.

Anyhoo, about this new book, it’s called The Go-Giver Leader. I’ve never seen the old man doing so much stuff like talking it up on the phone, writing emails, doing interviews on that Skype thing he has, blog posts, and other things. It’s crazy. I think I even once heard him use the word, “meshuga” though I think that kinda’ means the same thing as crazy.

If you want to know more about it, you can read an excerpt or even an entire sample chapter by clicking here.

Or, you can go right to Amazon.com which I’m pretty sure is where Pops goes to buy my cat food. Which, reminds me — I have a feeling that the more people who buy his book, the better the chances are I can keep eating that really expensive cat food. Okay, don’t tell Dad I said that. He’d be mad because he likes people to buy stuff from him only because they feel it will be — how does he say it? — oh, that’s right, “more in value to them than what they are paying for it”…or something like that. Meow!

So, click here, take a look, buy the book if you’d like, and tell all your human friends about it. I think they’ll like it. Okay…and they’ll find it to be of value, too.

Yours in meowness,

Calvin

Strong Cultures Welcome Dissent

March 22nd, 2016 by Bob Burg

In Adam Grant’s fantastic (like, “beyond-words fantastic”) new book, Originals: How Non-Conformists Move The World, Chapter 7 includes the story of Ray Dalio, billionaire founder of the venerable investment firm, Bridgewater Associates.

Ray DalioI was excited to see that. In one of my books I quoted Mr. Dalio, as much a philosopher as a successful business person, as saying, “I believe that the biggest problem that humanity faces is an ego sensitivity to finding out whether one is right or wrong, and identifying what one’s strengths and weakness are.”

Love that saying because ego, a main driver of our emotions, can cause significant damage when it controls its human host.

And, it so often does. No, it’s not just about hurt feelings and bad business decisions. Out of control egos have resulted in catastrophies such as wars, evil dictators, and masses of people unnecessarily struggling for survival; events taking place even today.

On the other hand, when controlled and properly directed the results can be, well, a company like his.

Dr. Grant describes Bridgwater as “a highly cohesive, close-knit community, to the point that its staff frequently call it a family, and it’s common for employees to stay for decades.”

They also promote dissent. Respectful dissent, of course. But, dissent. Groupthink is discouraged in every way. If someone is off course with their actions, people are expected to communicate that to the person directly…including calling out Ray Dalio himself!

The author shared an email that Mr. Dalio received that at practically any other company would most likely have resulted in a firing. He welcomed it. The sender of the email was correct. And the founder, the company, and its investors benefitted.

Of course, there is much more to the art of positive dissent than just this (and, a lot more to Mr. Dalio’s leadership philosophy, outlined in over 200 principles he personally wrote — a highly-recommended read!). Dr. Grant’s thorough research and entertaining way of presenting the information leaves the reader with an understanding that when done correctly, dissent leads to constant innovation and growth based on superb original ideas.

What made this even more enlightening, though, was the comparison the author made with another company; one that had been amongst the most respected and highly-profitable (and innovative) companies in the world…before groupthink and discouraging dissent became it’s cultural nature. (Prepare to shake your head in disgust when reading that part.)

So, is Ray Dalio’s methodology, including putting his ego aside and — not just allowing, but — insisting on honest feedback just feel-goody fluff? Or, does it have an outcome on their bottom line? In other words, does it translate into business success?

Well, in what is a very volatile industry, the company’s two major funds have performed amazingly well, and consistently for over 30 years.

As Dr. Grant writes, “They’ve been recognized for making more money for clients than any hedge fund in the history of the industry. In 2010, {their} returns exceeded the combined profits of Google, eBay, Yahoo, and Amazon.

Yes, I’d say it’s a positive thing. And, very original.

———-

To order Dr. Adam Grant’s book, Originals: How Non-Conformists Move The World, click here.

John David Mann’s and my new book, The Go-Giver Leader will be released on March 29th. Click here to read an excerpt or sample chapter, or click here to pre-order. If you enjoyed The Go-Giver I think you’re really going to like this one. For bulk orders for your company or organization click here.

Announcing The Go-Giver Podcast

March 9th, 2016 by Bob Burg

After a year of planning, learning, attending seminars on the topic, and all the techy things involved :-)… we have launched The Go-Giver Podcast!

Okay, a bit more dramatic than necessary, but it has been a remarkable learning process and we hope you’ll find value in each episode. We also hope it will make a positive difference for you both personally and professionally.

The format of each show will include a brief overview of the episode’s topic and then a compelling interview with an expert and authority on that topic.

The Go-Giver PodcastThese interviews will typically be briefer than the ones you’ve listened to on this blog. One goal is for the shows to be quick, entertaining, and most of all, impactful.

Please click here to listen to Episode #1. My guest is none other than my amazing Go-Giver series coauthor, Mr. John David Mann. If you’ve never heard the story about how his 17 year old self actually founded a high-school, you’re going to love this! (Hey, he didn’t see enough value at the one he was at so what else is a young entrepreneur to do but form his own high school!?) 😉

We’ll be releasing a number of episodes over the first few weeks with awesome guests including Anthony Iannarino, Dondi Scumaci, Joe Calloway and others, and then most likely settle into one per week.

I expect that — with your feedback — we’ll improve the format and bring you more of what you want and find to be of value.

May I ask for your help in spreading the word about about The Go-Giver Podcast?

Here’s are several things you can do, if you would like to participate (of course, there’s never any obligation to do so)…

  1. Subscribe. After listening to the first episode (click here), subscribe to The Go-Giver Podcast. That way you’ll be notified as soon as it’s available.
  2. Rate and Review it. By providing a rating and write a review this will help to position it on iTunes (For helpful instructions on how to rate and review it, please go to: http://www.thegogiver.com/reviews).
  3. Share this with others and let them know about it.

I truly hope you find these episodes to be a lot of fun. And, of course, very valuable!

Why Jay Baer says, “Hug Your Haters”

February 29th, 2016 by Bob Burg

Whether you lead a Fortune 500 company or are an entrepreneur running a small business, there are two things you can be sure of:

First is that your bread is buttered by your customers. As Sam Walton famously said, “There is only one boss. The customer. And he can fire everybody in the company from the chairman on down, simply by spending his money somewhere else.”

Hug Your Hater - Jay BaerSecond is that you will have a number of these customers who will be unhappy with their experience and want to complain. Some will do so — as Jay Baer, author of the great new book, Hug Your Haters: How to Embrace Complaints and Keep Your Customers says — “offstage” meaning privately. And, others will do so “onstage” meaning on some type of public forum where many others are sure to notice.

The biggest problem with this second challenge is not the complaints themselves but the failure to respond to them and/or not responding to them correctly.

For ease of explanation the author refers to all complainers as “haters.” However, he actually discusses situations ranging from those who are simply information-seekers and mild complainers, to yes…the somewhat insane actual haters who can truly ruin a company’s reputation if not handled correctly.

The bad news about the fact that haters can take their issues (regardless of whether real or imagined) public is obvious.

However, there’s also much good news. IF you handle it correctly, not only can you turn these haters into your most loyal fans and ambassadors; you can do the same with the people who are merely looking on as undecideds.

In this brief chat with Jay, we’ll discuss:

  • The brave new world of haters
  • The fact that haters are not your problem, but something else most definitely is
  • Why the saying, “Don’t feed the trolls” is no longer good advice
  • The importance of playing, not just to the hater, but to the…spectators
  • Why haters actually represent your greatest opportunity
  • The best way to head off haters in the first place
  • The three most important things he learned while writing this book (that he hopes we learn, too!)

Enjoy!

Jay Baer

 

 

 

 

www.HugYourHaters.com

Jay Baer truly brings a wise perspective to what we think we know about customer engagement; especially the more difficult — and potentially dangerous — type. As he says in the introduction to the book, “I wrote this to help all business owners and managers understand how to turn customer service into marketing, and use it as your true competitive advantage.”

Be sure and visit www.HugYourHaters.com and purchase his book, and put this fantastic information to use.

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