• Dynamic...
  • Inspiring...
  • Entertaining...
  • Principle-Based...
  • Immediately, Effective...
  • Bob Burg

“If Benjamin Franklin had picked someone to teach the lessons in self-mastery that he used in his life, he would have picked Bob Burg.”

~ Vic Johnson, Founder AsAManThinketh.net

Cole Slaw, Carrots, and Limiting Beliefs

September 20th, 2017 by Bob Burg

We’ve often explored the concept of Belief Systems and how our personal way of understanding and relating to the world — typically on an unconscious level — directs our behaviors.

Recently I heard what was perhaps the perfect example of how these unconscious beliefs manifest and affect everyone whose lives we touch.

Last month I was cordially, errr… invited to serve on jury duty. During voir dire Thomas Berger, a long-time successful South Florida attorney, related a personal story to help us understand how our personal belief systems (what he termed, “prejudices”) could potentially affect our judgement.

He’d been in a restaurant with a fellow lawyer and was ordering his side dishes from the gentleman directly serving him the food. After requesting cole slaw and carrots, the server gave him a tiny bit of cole slaw and a large amount of carrots. As Mr. Berger noticed this his colleague immediately said to the server, “You hate cole slaw but you love carrots!”

The server immediately replied, “Yes, how did you know?”

Of course, what the server did was unconsciously impose his beliefs on his customer. “If I hate cole slaw but love carrots then it makes sense that everyone else does, too.”

Mr. Berger’s story was right on the mark. As human beings we tend to believe that the way we see the world is not only correct, but that pretty much everyone else sees the world the same way we do. How could it be any different? That’s all we know; the way we understand it.

This is why I define a belief as a “subjective truth.” In other words, the truth as one understands the truth to be.

In reality, Truth just is. The way it’s understood, however, is as varied as there are human beings.

Unfortunately, when we don’t recognize this we can trip ourselves up, such as the sales professional who had difficulty calling referraled prospects because she didn’t like receiving calls from salespeople referred to her. Like the above server, if she didn’t like it then her prospective customers wouldn’t either.

As leaders; as sales professionals; as friends and family members, do we assume that what we like or don’t like is exactly what others like or don’t like, as well?

If so, we are letting our beliefs hinder us from best serving others, as well as ourselves.

Remember, “Value is always in the eyes of the beholder.”

Value is in the eye of the beholder

We can only know what another person needs, wants, or desires by asking and then listening; without — as Mr. Berger would call it — prejudice.

Sometimes this results in making a huge difference in another person’s life.

Other times it simply means we give them more cole slaw.

Both are important.

Communicating the Vision

August 26th, 2017 by Bob Burg

Speaking with a client about an ongoing issue with his sales team, I brought up a particular concept. When he heard it, he loved it. He saw exactly how it applied to his situation. He also expressed amazement that he had never heard this before.

Except, he had. He’d heard about it numerous times. I know this for a fact since I’m the one from whom he’d heard it numerous times.

Now, lest you think my point is to boast about my great idea, the idea was hardly mine. In fact, the idea is so old there’s no one to even credit for it.

My point is that people can hear an idea but not actually grasp it because they’re not ready to. But, if we don’t continue to repeat it (not obnoxiously, of course, but appropriately, as part of an ongoing message) then even when they are ready they still won’t hear it, because we’ve stopped saying it.

Same for Teams and Organizations

As leaders, as teachers, as influencers, we can—we must—cast a vision. That’s the easy part. Then not only must we hold that vision but continue to communicate it.

Bob-Burg-Communicating-the-Vision

Eventually, when they do get it, and ask you why you never told them that before, rather than calling them a dummy or yelling at them for not listening, simply smile and give them credit for grabbing on to it.

The same goes for when you’ve been telling them something forever and then they suddenly hear it from a third-party, and then report back to you with the brilliant piece of advice they just heard. Simply smile and give them credit for being open to new ideas.

Because a true leader doesn’t care who gets the credit. They just want the ideas to be received and their people to benefit.

And, the more you put the right message in front of them—whether directly from you or from a third-party authority—repetition is critical to effective leadership and influence.

Make Yourself DiscountProof

July 6th, 2017 by Bob Burg

Make Yourself Discount-Proof - Bob BurgAre you often asked to discount your fee or price?

Typically, when a prospective customer or client balks at your price, it’s because they believe that the value of your offering is less than what they are being asked to pay.

But, not always. There IS another reason. It’s this…

They subscribe to the theory that one should never accept the first price; that every price is negotiable.

In other words, yes, they absolutely believe the value of your product or service exceeds the price. They want to buy. They just want to get the lowest price they can.

We believe that if the fee you charge is appropriate then there is no need to discount it. You are providing absolutely exceptional value and should be making a very healthy profit.

As the first of the Five Laws of Stratospheric Success in The Go-Giver, the Law of Value states:

Your true worth is determined by how much more you give in value
than you take in payment.

But They Still Want You To Discount

This can be unnerving, right? After all, you’ve worked hard for this sale. You’ve already invested so much time, research and sweat. You don’t want to lose it. (By the way, all of this is exactly what that person is counting on you feeling.)

Good news: You can maintain your fee.

3 things must be in place:

  1. You know you are, without question, worth what you are charging.
  2. You have effectively communicated value that exceeds the price.
  3. You phrase your response respectfully, confidently, and tactfully.

One of our clients who we’ll call “Brenda” owns a private-duty nursing company. She recently received a call from someone who’d seen her advertisement. It was a woman who — along with her siblings — felt it was time their 90-year-old Mother had a professional nurse with her throughout the day.

Brenda did the discovery, quoted her fee of $30 per hour, and provided a number of references. Her fee is a bit higher than many of her competitors, which Brenda let her know.

Two days later she received a text from the prospective client saying:

“I discussed this with my brother and sister. We’d love to hire you. If you would agree to $25 we’ll go ahead and sign the contract with you right now.”

What Did Brenda Do? What Would You Do?

While $5 per hour might not sound like much, it actually has two effects:

  1. Over time it is significantly less money.
  2. More importantly, it tells you — and the marketplace — that your market value is $25 per hour, not $30.

Brenda texted back a very nice message that said:

“Good morning, Sue! Thank you and I completely understand if my fee is not in your budget. Your Mom sounds lovely and it would be my pleasure to help out if circumstances change.”

Just moments later Brenda received a return text that said:

“Please don’t walk away. We will pay $30 an hour and we’re so excited to have found you. We will make it work. Please reconsider.”

As Brenda Suspected

It simply was a matter of their instinctively trying to get a better price.

Notice what Brenda did:

  1. Knowing her value she made the decision to stand by her fee.
  2. Rather than react with disgust, disappointment, or indignation she responded with respect, confidence, and tact.
  3. She thanked the person, complimented their Mom, and shared that it would be her pleasure to work with them if circumstances change.

Again, because she had done a thorough discovery of what the family was looking for and communicated her value accordingly, plus backed it up further with a number of testimonials, she was very confident that the only reason for the price negotiation tactic being used by the children was because they felt that’s what they were supposed to do.

With that in mind Brenda’s job was to handle the objection correctly, which she did. And the family will benefit greatly, as will Brenda’s company.

Line

We’re always delighted to know that our clients have benefitted from the principles we teach in order to have more lucrative and more enjoyable businesses. Would you like to work on your business in-depth and in person with Kathy Tagenel and me over a very special two days?

Registration is open for our final Go-Giver Sales Academy Live Workshop in 2017. It will be held in Orlando, Florida, and it is limited to just 10 people as we go deep into helping you accelerate your business. Special early registration pricing ends July 12th or until we are filled up (whichever comes first). Check out the rave review from past attendees. I hope you can join Kathy Tagenel and me, and up to nine other successful entrepreneurs and salespeople. Visit gogiversalesacademy.com

A Very, Very Important Question

May 20th, 2017 by Bob Burg

A Very, Very Important Question - Bob Burg

    1. Cleaning out some files I came across one of the many quotes and sayings I’ve cut out and saved over the years.

It contains such wisdom that if we’ll only keep it in mind and ask ourselves this question on an ongoing basis we have an excellent chance of attaining that which we truly desire.

“Is what I am about to say or do consistent with my Life’s Mission?”

I don’t know who originally said or wrote that* but I think it is about as perfect a question as can be asked.

After all, if we were to frame everything we’re about to say and every decision we’re about to make in terms of congruency with that question, well…it’d pretty difficult not to meet with huge success.

Of course, we all make mistakes and even keeping that question at the highest part of our conscious awareness is certainly no guarantee of always doing the right thing.

But wow, it certainly ups the odds, doesn’t it?

So, what is your life’s mission? And, what might you do to get into the habit of asking yourself this very important question constantly and consistently?
 

Line

 
* And now I do know. It was the great, Joe Tye from his book, Your Dreams Are Too Small http://amzn.to/2r6qNRt

Victim OR Victor

April 20th, 2017 by Bob Burg

Victim OR VictorIn this blog we’ve often discussed the “false dilemma” — the unnecessary use of the word “or.”

For example, “Wealthy OR Happy” as though it’s necessarily one OR the other when of course it can and should be both. Another is “nice OR successful.” Then there’s “giver OR receiver.” And numerous others.

On the other hand there are those things that are one or the other.

One cannot be angry AND happy.  A leader cannot be a manipulator AND have a loyal organization. A colleague cannot be a known gossiper AND respected.

And…a person cannot be a victim AND a victor. It truly is one OR the other.

Before I continue please allow me to establish a premise that differs from some others. There’s a teaching by many in the personal development community claiming that there are no victims and that we all — perhaps on some type of metaphysical level — always directly cause our own situations. With all respect, I disagree.

In my opinion, there certainly are victims, and through no cause of their own. People (and groups of people) are victims of natural disasters, of elements of their birth, of upbringing, of diseases, of despotic tyrants, of bullying, of horrible incidents that they did not cause.

They are victims. They did not bring it upon themselves.

However, I believe the choice they have is whether to remain a victim or do whatever they can in order to improve their lot and become victors.

Because if there’s one thing I’ve noticed in 59 years is that there is no such thing as a victim AND a victor…simultaneously.

Many victors began as victims or had something horrible happen to them where they became victims. But at some point they made an important decision.

A friend of mine explained how many years ago he got “taken” by his partners with whom he’d cofounded a franchise. When the franchise later became a huge success he was left with crumbs. He told me that for a number of years he lived in anger, resentment, and victimhood, sharing the story with anyone and everyone who would listen.

Indeed, he was a victim. But it was only after he decided he was tired of playing that role did he go on to build other successful businesses and reach the level of success  and happiness he knew he could. As he told me, so long as he remained in victim mode there was no way he could accomplish what he wanted.

Both individuals and groups — most of us have been victims of something. Sometimes little things. And other times, really, really big, horrendous, even monstrous things. And we all have the right to remain a victim and live in our victimhood.

Or, we can decide we’re no longer content with that, and do everything we can to become a victor, an overcomer, a hero of our circumstance.

One thing we cannot do is be both victim AND victor. It is definitely an OR.

Agree? Disagree? Feel free to share your thoughts.