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  • Bob Burg

“Nothing short of fantastic. I would recommend, without reservation, Bob's program to any other sales professional.”

~ Allen L. Howard, CLU, General Manager, New York Life Insurance Company

Just How Powerful an Influencer Are You?

August 18th, 2014 by Bob Burg

Bob Burg Ultimate Influence AssessmentI define Influence as the ability to move a person(s) to a desired action, usually within the context of a specific goal. Ultimate Influence™ is the ability to get the results you want when dealing with others while helping them feel genuinely good…about themselves, about the situation, and about you.

The person who does this consistently can be a great corporate or team leader, a top-producing sales professional and an overall success in life.

Would you like to know where you currently stand in this regard?

I just created a self-assessment tool, the Ultimate Influence™ Assessment, that you are invited to take. (And, it’s free!)

It includes 14 value-based questions designed to provide you with both influence and persuasion knowledge as well as an excellent idea of your areas of strength and those areas in which you can improve.

Visit http://bit.ly/1pDtj9f.

Have fun!

And, if you’d like, let us know of any thoughts or feedback you have.

Of course, if you find this to be of value, I’d love for you to pass it along to others.

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The Ultimate Influence™ Assessment is based on the Five Key Principles of Ultimate Influence from my book Adversaries into Allies.

Sir Sidney Poitier’s Inspiring Advice

August 14th, 2014 by Bob Burg

Nancy Vogl owns a successful speakers bureau and regularly posts to a Facebook group of speaking professionals to which I belong. One of her recent posts – while intended as a lesson for speakers, – is a lesson for everyone, both in terms of following our own dreams…and in being an encourager for others to follow theirs. Both attributes help make for a successful human being.

Here’s Nancy’s post, edited just slightly in order to make it less “speaker-specific.”

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A LESSON FROM SIR SIDNEY POITIER
Posted on Facebook by Nancy Vogl

Tyler and Sidney PoitierLast month, NSA (National Speakers Association) Youth Leader — and my grandson — Tyler Cole spent two glorious hours on his 18th birthday with the legendary actor, Sidney Poitier. Tyler recently graduated from one of the most prestigious performing arts high schools in the country (LACHSA), and Mr. Poitier invited Tyler to his home to screen one of Tyler’s award-winning student films and to talk about acting and filmmaking.

Early on in the visit, Sidney in his rich, melodic voice said to Tyler:

“So, I understand you want to be an actor…is that right?”, cocking his head to the side, in a classic Sidney Poitier move.

“Yes sir, yes I do,” replied Tyler with great conviction.

Sidney paused and smiled for a brief moment, then looked Tyler square in the eyes, pointing his finger right at his heart, as if he were speaking to his soul, and said, “You already are.”

What Sidney Poitier did for Tyler — on that once-in-a-lifetime day — with that simple phrase was simply this: He reminded Tyler that it was his desire, his passion, his determination, his talent, his love for the craft that gives him the right to call himself an “Actor.” From there, his task is taking deliberate action so the rest of the world knows it too.

And so it goes with anyone wishing to make their mark in the world.

If your heart is burning to share your message, talents or gifts, and you, too, are determined to work at your craft with gusto, you can call yourself whatever you choose. Now, your task is working towards that goal.

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Nancy Vogl owns Nancy Vogl Speakers Bureau. If you are having a conference, Nancy can help you choose the right speaker(s) to fit your needs.

Chris Brogan Says The Freaks Shall Inherit The Earth

July 31st, 2014 by Bob Burg

Chris Brogan is one of my favorite people, and I’m far from the only one who feels that way.

While renown for his online prowess, that’s not how he built his business. He did it through building relationships. Technology has simply been one platform he has used in order to accomplish that.
Freaks Shall Inherit The Earth
His newest book is, The Freaks Shall Inherit The Earth: Entrepreneurship for Weirdos, Misfits, and World Dominators. It provides terrific advice on how those who don’t see themselves as part of the crowd can tap into their true authentic nature and create immense value; especially for those whose needs and desires make for a very natural connection.
Chris Brogan
And, in this brief but powerful (and, with Chris, ALWAYS entertaining) chat, Chris shows us that there’s a method to the madness…especially where freaks are concerned. :-)

Enjoy…

What were your biggest takeaways from this discussion? Any surprises? Does the word, “monchu” provide you with any ideas of what you might need to do in order to build that sense of connection with those you want to serve?

Please feel free to share your thoughts. And, of course, pick up “Freaks…” at www.CallingAllFreaks.com


TECHNICAL NOTE: If you are having trouble playing the interview, please make sure Adobe Flash Player is installed in your web browser. If not, then download Flash Player. Or right-click here and select “Save Link As…” to download the audio file to your computer.

Don’t Let Yourself Be “Chris Matthews-ed”

July 25th, 2014 by Bob Burg

Chris MatthewsA large part of influence is believability. Believability inspires trust. If you are believable once, you’ll get a shot at being believable again. If you are not believable just once, however (especially if it’s someone’s first exposure to you), the chances are excellent that you will not be considered such from that point on.

I recently witnessed a person make a somewhat dogmatic statement during a discussion. When asked to cite his source he began to hem and haw. When further pressed he grumbled something or other and got mad at the person who questioned him. Whether his statement was right or wrong, his lack of even basic source knowledge made him…unbelievable. In this case, “UN-believable” was not a good thing. :-)

The incident immediately brought to mind an interview conducted in May, 2008 by MSNBC TV Hardball host, Chris Matthews. In this segment, one of his guests was Los Angeles-based Radio Talk Show Host, Kevin James. As James began to bring up British Prime Minister, Neville Chamberlain’s well-known appeasement of Hitler during the lead-up to World War II, Matthews asked him to explain what he meant. In other words, how exactly did Chamberlain appease Hitler?

Beginning at 4:10 of the video and all the way through the 7:05 mark, James danced around the issue. Matthews, of course, refused to let him off the hook. Finally, it was determined that James wasn’t able to cite anything specific, most notably the infamous Munich Agreement.

Now, does that mean that Mr. James was wrong? Not at all. Chamberlain certainly did appease Hitler. And, if you listen to that part of the interview, James wasn’t incorrect in anything he said.

However, the fact that he couldn’t cite an example of this appeasement — one of the most famous in history — simply took away any type of credibility he might have had with Mr. Matthews’ audience.

Personally, being a Libertarian and believing in both free minds and free markets, I certainly don’t agree with most of the political ideas Mr. Matthews advocates. Nor do I enjoy his communication style. He’s an interrupter who at times can even be insulting.  But, you know what else Mr. Matthews is? He’s very intelligent; he’s very sharp. And, he’s not about to let someone get away with “not backing up their statements.”

I learned a hugely important lesson from that interview: to never place myself in a position where I can be “Chris Matthews-ed.”

In other words, if we’re going to make a statement of fact or attempt to persuasively advance our idea, we need to not only know what we’re talking about, we need to be able to communicate that we know what we’re talking about. Especially, if pressed to do so.

Of course, I believe we should do this with tact, kindness and respect for the other person, even if we do not agree. Part of being able to do that effectively is knowing — really knowing — from whence we speak.

Your thoughts?

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Very soon we’ll be re-opening our Certified Go-Giver Speaker Program to 12 more speakers. We limit it to 12 so that each new Speaker can receive the attention and teaching they need and deserve and be ready to hit the ground running in their business. Want to be alerted when we re-open? Visit www.GoGiverSpeaker.com.

The Next Best Thing to Controlling Our Brand

July 16th, 2014 by Bob Burg

To What Degree Can We “Control” Our Brand?At our recent Speaker Certification Training for a group of our Certified Go-Giver Speakers, the following was pointed out:

“Bob, you are really protective of your brand.”

All heads nodded in agreement…including mine.

Allow me — if I may — to set the stage: On the day that our speakers were giving their presentations, whenever there was a statement that could possibly be misunderstood, I would, afterwards, gently (yes, gently) point it out and explain why.

I’m also known to politely email bloggers and those on Social Media platforms who take the philosophy of The Go-Giver out of context or misquote. And, it happens often.

Does it drive me a little bit nutty keeping on top of it? Sure, to a certain point. Fortunately, it also teaches me two very valuable lessons:

  1. To the degree you can care without emotional attachment to the results, that’s the degree to which you’ll have peace of mind.
  2. You can manage your brand, but you can’t really control it.

We, as business people in today’s environment, cannot control it any more than we can really control anything that is outside our direct influence. We can manage it by taking all the steps that are within our influence. That begins by communicating our message correctly, always doing our best to provide an exceptional customer experience and being ultra-responsive to our customer’s needs.

Along with that, we can utilize various Internet and social media “alerts” to let us know when something about our brand is positively or negatively mentioned, stolen (accidentally or…”accidentally on purpose”) :-) or simply misinterpreted. People who are “watching our backs” will also let us know, and this includes customers, clients and friends.

There are major corporations that — especially in their utilization of social media — do this extremely well. Others? Not so much. And, we continue to see examples of both.

Regardless, whether huge or mid-sized companies or small entrepreneurial firms, none are actually controlling their brands. Those days are along gone. We can manage our brands; not control them.

Wisdom is knowing the difference.

Success is doing it effectively.

How do you do in that regard? And, do you agree with my premise or have I missed the mark?

Agreement and disagreement are both welcome, as I hope you know.